The Challenge of the Testimony by the Angel(s) to the Women at Jesus’ Tomb

Continuing with the fifth posting in this series, we have seen up to this point that the Garden Tomb accounts demonstrate very clearly that the gospel writers’ personalities were intact toward what the Spirit had inspired each of writers.  Each writer of the gospels chose what they wrote under the guise of the Holy Spirit.

For skeptics like the one who challenged me, this next posting is going to reinforce the points that I have presented up to this point. 

Angels or Angel, Men or Man? Who Announced His Resurrection?

If you have just been answering the question without reading the posts, you are missing out on a good Bible study thus far. For some these posts might be an introduction or a reintroduction to  hermeneutics, or a study in the harmony of the gospels, OR learning more about undesigned coincidences. Whichever the case, we will often run into a skeptic that will challenge passages, missing the fact that the minds and personalities of the writers of the gospels remained in tact when the wrote their particular accounts.

Are there contradictions in the time the women went to the tomb?

Continuing on the series on what happened at the tomb, another skeptic tells me that there is a problem with what the gospel writers record with reference to the time of day when the women arrived at the tomb of Jesus. Whenever critics of the Bible see one account differing from another in wording or phrasing, they are quick to point out that the gospel writers cannot be in agreement with one another.

This post is going to demonstrate that there really is no problem, and that there are no contradictions between the writers. 

Contemplative Prayer, is it Biblical?

One of my favorite disciplines under the umbrella of theology is the what is called contemporary theology.  Marrying this to the style of apologetics, to the beginnings of my journeying into apologetics, I was involved in what would be called today, counter cult apologetics. If you think of it, contemporary theology and cult movements in our culture really make for an interesting blog post. This is where I want to begin a series on what is called the New Apostolic Reformation.  Before I do that, I want address what I consider to be the “initial camel in the tent” which led to this new wave in modern Christendom. That “camel” is what is known as contemplative prayer.